Crane Project

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Download the Crane Project pdf that tells you how you can get involved[linebreak style=”simple”]

[linebreak style=”simple”][linebreak style=”simple”]Folding origami cranes is easy! Watch the video at the bottom of the page!

Prayer BY Prayer, Crane BY Crane

How does anyone respond to anothers grief? How does a child, or a community, or a state, or a country help someone in pain?

In cultures around the world, the crane has long been considered a symbol of peace and hope, and it is often depicted to soothe souls of their suffering.

Following this tradition, children in Hill City, South Dakota—population 900—have begun a project intended to send an irrefutable message of love to the families in Newtown, Connecticut. They are folding origami cranes—embedded with drawings or written prayers, wishes, and personal messages—for suffering families in Newtown and around the world.

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If you would rather not opt-in and get information about the project, there is a link to the PDF at the bottom of the page.

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The Crane Project
“Art is a wound turned into light.” Georges Braque

The artist who inspired this project, Lorri Acott, has located a template, instructions, and a video that teaches the process of how to fold an origami crane.She is working with Hill City art teachers to teach anyone who wants to learn.

“Each crane is a representation of a prayer,” Acott said. “One person, one crane, one prayer.”

With the help of the Hill City Arts Council and the South Dakota Arts Council, Hill City’s children imagine spreading the word across the country and throughout the world, so that other schools and communities can participate, as well. The Newtown Arts Commission is spearheading the project on the receiving end—housing the cranes and hooking up local children with the hands-on project.

“Art has a transformational quality,” Acott said. “Art gives people a place to put their grief, sorrow, and pain—and a way to begin to transform it. Art gives both children and adults a way to share a silent prayer that cannot be adequately expressed in words—and if anyone needs our prayers right now, it’s the folks in
Newtown.”

“This project is a tangible way that people can actually do something to help others—and themselves,” said Kristin Donnan Standard, president of the Hill City Arts Council. “This is art at its highest service.”

Acott and the Hill City students imagine Newtown children stringing the cranes together and decorating their community with the well wishes of people across America and throughout the world.

“This project is tangible way that people can actually do something to help others–and themselves,” said Kristin Donnan Standard, president of the Hill City Arts Council. “This is art at its highest service.”

Download the Crane Project pdf that tells you how you and your community can get involved here

Folding is easy! Watch the video

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